• Pont du Gard
  • The river below the aqueduct
  • the river above the aqueduct

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Pont du Gard

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Pont du Gard

The Pont du Gard is an ancient Roman aqueduct bridge that crosses the Gardon River in southern France. It is part of the Nîmes aqueduct, a 50 km-long structure built by the Romans to carry water from a spring at Uzès to the Roman colony of Nemausus (Nîmes).

Canal routeBecause the terrain between the two points is hilly, the aqueduct – built mostly underground – took a long, winding route that crossed the gorge of the Gardon, requiring the construction of an aqueduct bridge. Built in the 1st century AD, the Pont du Gard is the highest of all Roman aqueduct bridges and one of the best preserved.

The Nîmes aqueduct was built to channel water from the springs of the Fontaine d'Eure near Uzès to Nimes. From there, it was distributed to fountains, baths and private homes around the city.